T-16

Wed, Jun 12, 2013 by Guest Blogger

Chemistry, English, General

Janet Lei, participant 2013. // 16 days.  That’s all that stands between me and total immersion into what promises to be an extremely inspiring and eye-opening mind soup with the Nobel Laureates and my fellow young researchers.  Too many superlatives?  I just can’t contain my excitement!  My supervisor rolled my eyes at me again today because I was chewing off the ear of another colleague about how great Lindau is going to be.  I’ve been told that I have good days, where I manage to keep calm and reign it all in, and bad ones, when I’m getting downright annoying.  Since I’ve talked to 6 different people about Lindau today, and it’s only 3pm, I would probably consider this a bad day.

I just saw that what is probably the final schedule for the 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting is online now, and I’m already cracking up at the page with the Nobel Laureates’ pictures on it - Dr. Chu has these great aviation/swimming goggles on, and Dr. Fischer’s got a really sweet picture of him and his dog.  Last week, we young researchers were able to register for one (just one!) Science Breakfast and a Master Class of our choice.  It’s like they’re throwing us little crumbs every week, but I’m completely ready to devour the whole pie!

I’m really looking forward to Dr. Ciechanover’s Master Class, “New Frontiers in Deciphering Mechanisms of Diseases and in Drug Development” – a chance to see what kind of wonderful work my fellow researchers are up to and the insight that Dr. Ciechanover will bring to their projects.  It’s certainly amazing that the Laureates, who could actually just, well, rest on their laurels, are still so keen on being involved with the training of the next generation of scientists.  Simply inspiring.

I’ve also signed up for the Science Breakfast, “It Is All About Chemistry.  How We Tackle the Energy Challenges of the Future!”  It’s going to be a great discussion about the future of energy and participants will be split up into small discussion groups and the ideas will be summarized at the end.  It’s a fantastic format that truly reflects the open discussion culture that is unique to Lindau.  It’s too bad that we’re limited to just one breakfast (but we will get breakfast the other days too…right?), because I also really want to attend the Science Breakfast, “How Can Science Drive Solutions That Better Use the Planet’s Resources?”

So only two and a half weeks to go!  Looking forward to see you all at Lindau for a week of inspiring discussions and open dialogue, meeting the Laureates and fellow young researchers, and a wonderful exchange of ideas (sunny weather optional, but greatly appreciated)!

Janet is a PhD student in lab of Prof. Martin Löchelt at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, Germany.  After finishing her B.Sc. and BA at the University of British Columbia in 2009, she moved on to Saarbrücken, Germany, where she got her M.Sc. in Biotechnology in 2011.  Janet’s current work involves the use of apathogenic retroviruses as a scaffold for vaccine antigens.

In addition to the lab, Janet is actively involved in the PhD Student Council at the DKFZ.  She is very passionate about sewing, photography, travelling the world, and food, and is a major contributor at the PhooD Journal.

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